The impact of black artists in Asia on the contemporary art of Negros occidental and the Visayas region, and on a wider scale, the contemporary art narrative of the Philippines

Olivares Jocson, Georgina Luisa (2012) The impact of black artists in Asia on the contemporary art of Negros occidental and the Visayas region, and on a wider scale, the contemporary art narrative of the Philippines. Masters thesis, LASALLE College of the Arts.

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Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Title: The impact of black artists in Asia on the contemporary art of Negros occidental and the Visayas region, and on a wider scale, the contemporary art narrative of the Philippines
Synopsis:

The social realist movement in the Philippines reached its height in the period leading up to the 1986 popular uprising which threw autocratic president Ferdinand Marcos into exile and installed as the people’s president, Corazon “Cory” Aquino, widow of the slain opposition leader, Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. Artists of that time saw the need to band together, forming groups such as the militant Nagkakaisang Progresibong Artista at Arkitekto (United Progressive Artist and Architects) in 1971 and Kaisahan (Union) in 1976.
Over in the Visayas region, the feudal social conditions of Negros Occidental were fomenting their own version of abuse, hunger, and displacement. For over a century, vast tracts of the island had been fenced off as sugarcane haciendas (plantations) in the possession of a few hacenderos (plantation owners). When the price of sugar bottomed out worldwide in the mid-80s, thousands of plantation workers and sacadas (contractual workers) lost their livelihood, triggering pervasive starvation and political violence.
The 1986 EDSA Revolution offered the promise of freedom and a new democracy, which artists in Negros took to heart. From this potent mix of political euphoria, economic devastation and social inequality rose the Negros-based socially committed visual arts organization, Black Artists in Asia (BAA), which eventually became closely identified with Norberto Roldan, Charlie Co, Nunelucio Alvarado and Dennis Ascalon.
Although the group has been in existence for a quarter of a century, there is a notable lack of documented information on its activities and projects. Hence, this thesis proposes to research and record the 25-year history of Black Artists in Asia through interviews, archival research, and a semiotic analysis of selected artworks of Roldan, Co, Alvarado and Ascalon. In doing so, this thesis will be equipped to evaluate BAA’s successes and failures vis-à-vis its stated goals, as well as ascertain the extent of its impact on the contemporary art of Negros Occidental and the Visayas region, and on a wider scale, the contemporary art narrative of the Philippines. Findings reveal a collective of complex dynamics and structure, which defined Negros art in the mid-80s to 1990s an which gained a measure of prominence in the nation’s artistic center, in spite of being located in the periphery.

Subjects: Fine Arts > Art -- Philippines
Divisions: Faculty of Fine Arts > Master - Asian Art Histories
Depositing User: Ms Ashalatha Krishnan
Date Deposited: 20 Feb 2013 08:01
Last Modified: 20 Feb 2013 08:01
URI: http://drlib.lasalle.edu.sg/id/eprint/71

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